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  • Posted by
    Jennifer K. Daniels
    Vice President, APICS Marketing

    How Supply Chain Can Help in a Natural Disaster

    There’s no limit to the aid that supply chain professionals can offer. Be it time, money or resources, supply chain professionals have many options to help those affected by natural disasters and crises. APICS members and the supply chain community at large are a force for good when disaster strikes.
  • Posted by
    Sharon Rice
    Principal Consultant, Art of Planning

    Reverse Innovation and Supply Chain

    I’m pleased to welcome guest blogger Jason Wheeler, CPIM, CSCP, to “Thinking Supply Chain.” Wheeler is Process Improvement Engineer, Warehouse Operations for Roche Diagnostics Operations and the former APICS chair-elect.
  • Posted by
    Bob Collins
    APICS Senior Director, Professional Development

    CPIM Reconfiguration: The World Is Coming to an End – But You’ll Be Just Fine!

    At APICS 2016, APICS announced that the iconic CPIM program will be reconfigured in 2017.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    The Trouble with Tricky Suppliers

    Trick-or-treating may be over for the year, but tricky suppliers are a problem all the time. Forbes highlighted this last week in the article “Do Supply Chain Audits Work? Dealing with Deviant Suppliers Like a Journalist.”
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    BlackBerry Expanding in Indonesia

    BlackBerry might not be making smartphones anymore, but the company has a new business model and is attempting to capitalize on the global market. According to The Wall Street Journal, BlackBerry is licensing its software and outsourcing its production in its largest market, Indonesia, which boasts a population of 250 million people.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Aviation Agrees to Limit Carbon Emissions

    Last Thursday, members of the United Nations’ International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) agreed to cap carbon dioxide emissions from international flights after 2020. The Wall Street Journal reports that airlines that don’t limit their emissions will have to buy carbon-offsetting credits.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    The High Cost of Cheap Minerals

    Last Friday’s cover story in The Washington Post, “The Cobalt Pipeline,” carefully examines how the valuable mineral travels via supply chains from Congo into consumers’ phones, laptops, and electric cars. Congo is home to a wealth of minerals and natural resources, but its population is very poor. Corruption along with human rights abuses and child labor in cobalt mining run rampant.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    APICS 2016: Elevating Your Supply Chain to New Heights

    At the conclusion of my 10th annual APICS conference, I continue to be amazed and motivated by the attendees, speakers, and APICS staff. I’m ecstatic to give readers everywhere a glimpse of what we learned this week in Washington, DC.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    3D Printing: UPS Turns Threats into Opportunities

    United Parcel Service (UPS) is making plans to adopt innovations in the 3D printing marketplace. The US shipping company announced last week that it would expand its 3D printing services to Asia and Europe “in a bid to fully embrace and get ahead of a trend that threatens to eat away a small but lucrative part of its business,” Nick Carey writes for Reuters.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Lost at Sea

    The title of this week’s Supply Chain Management Now isn’t from a new Hollywood thriller; this situation is real, and it’s serious. One of the world’s biggest shipping companies, South Korea-based Hanjin Shipping, filed for bankruptcy earlier this month, leaving as much as $14 billion worth of cargo floating and manufacturers uncertain, according to The Wall Street Journal.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Replenishing the World’s Water

    Although water covers almost 70 percent of the earth’s surface, only about 2.5 percent of it is fresh and only about 1 percent is easy to access. That means about one in nine people worldwide do not have access to safe and clean drinking water. Therefore, replenishing and preserving water is an immense part of sustainability efforts for industries and for individuals.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Zika Hits Supply Chain

    This summer, the world has heard a great deal about the Zika virus, especially as athletes and fans from all around the globe flocked to Brazil, an affected region, for the 2016 Olympics. As the mosquito-borne virus has spread to the United States, Zika has affected US supply chains and trade with China as well. Chinese officials have tracked the virus and keep a list of Zika-affected countries. Shipments from these countries must be fumigated before they enter the Chinese market. Last month, officials added the United States to this list. This new status has US exporters worried about added costs and shipping delays, according to The Wall Street Journal.
  • Posted by
    Jonathan Thatcher
    Director, APICS SCC Research

    Autognostics: The Rise of “Self-Aware” Digital Supply Chains

    Building self-managing networks seems like a modern solution to overcoming complexity that scales beyond human comprehension. The Internet is a common example. But human beings have actually been building complex, self-managing networks for a very long time—even before computers.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Pedaling Toward the (Supply Chain) Finish Line

    Business and bicycling: It’s not often that those two things are mentioned together. However, this week, Quartz ran a story advising businesses to learn from British Cycling and how it seized an opportunity to get more women involved in the sport.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Transparency’s Downsides

    It’s the solution we hear over and over again for many of our supply chain challenges: transparency. Transparency for suppliers, transparency for customers, and transparency for colleagues are all made out to be the ultimate answer. However, in his July 21 Harvard Business Review article, David De Cremer challenges that idea. He warns that transparency might not be the “universal solution—and may even create new problems.”
  • Posted by
    Laurie Denham
    Senior Director of Academic Relations

    Millennials Blazing Trails in the Supply Chain Industry

    The supply chain industry is an avenue full of career opportunities that can make a global impact. From supply chain to distribution and logistics, many young professionals are unaware of the career paths available in the industry
  • Posted by
    Jonathan Thatcher
    Director, APICS SCC Research

    Will the next 15 years be a logistics golden age?

    Logistics professionals help keep the world running in ordered motion. Their vision and imagination continually solve daunting challenges of time and space, yet forecast trends for the years 2016–2030 reveal a wave of change, which will test those talents.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Ramping Up after a Downturn

    The oil and gas industry is readying itself for a comeback. According to The Wall Street Journal, after two years of oil slump, there is a slow recovery happening. However, this recovery might be encumbered by labor shortages, equipment that has sat idle too long, and cash availability.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Selling E-Commerce in Africa

    In Lagos, Nigeria, curbside salespeople used to offer anything from plantain chips to mobile phones. In fact, street trading and street hawkers are a cultural tradition in this largest city in Nigeria. In a June 30, 2016, New Yorker article, Jake Bright describes these merchants and Jumia, the company that might change commerce as Nigeria, and perhaps even Africa, knows it. Jumia is branding itself as the “largest e-commerce platform in Africa.”
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Forecasting Brexit’s Logistics Implications

    Just about a week ago, the world received the news that citizens of the United Kingdom (UK) voted to withdraw from the European Union (EU) by a narrow margin of 4 percentage points. Now, after months of speculating whether or not Brexit could be a reality, the business world is forecasting how Brexit will affect global commerce. Shortly after the Brexit vote announcement, The Wall Street Journal published an article about how this political move will influence the European supply chain.
  • Posted by
    Hans Ehm
    Lead Principal Supply Chain Innovation, Infineon Technologies

    Bringing SCOR to Singapore

    A daylong educational forum in Singapore in July will introduce the SCOR model to supply chain professionals representing some of the world’s largest and most recognized semiconductor and electronics companies. The event is the Singapore Semiconductor Industry Association 2016 Forum titled, “Supply Chain Metrics and Measures: Applying the SCOR Model to Modern Challenges.”
  • Posted by
    Jonathan Thatcher
    Director, APICS SCC Research

    Brexit: What Does this Mean for Supply Chain Professionals?

    Last week, UK citizens voted to leave the European Union (EU) with the passing of a referendum known as Brexit—British Exit. The tidal wave of reaction and speculation which followed the announcement signals far-reaching effects from this historic change, and many supply chain professionals are asking, “how does Brexit impact my supply chains?” While I can’t answer that directly, I can provide a framework for developing an answer.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Panama Canal Expansion Equals Trade Expansion

    The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World include The Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt, the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey, and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon in Iraq. The modern world has its own wonders. According to the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Panama Canal is one of those wonders. Its expansion will open June 26, and The Wall Street Journal reports that this improvement is critical to Western trade in the economic long run. The canal accommodates about one-third of Asia-to-Americas trade but required infrastructure upgrades to keep up with the latest shipping trends.
  • Posted by
    Jonathan Thatcher
    Director, APICS SCC Research

    Can Your Supply Chain Keep Up?

    According to a Reuters report, Target is cracking down on suppliers to better compete with Amazon and Walmart. Target’s new policies, which took effect May 30, require suppliers to provide a single day arrival date for shipments to Target's warehouses and do away with delivery “grace periods.” Suppliers who fail to deliver on time will be charged late fees of 5 percent of the order cost, an increase from their previous 1 percent to 2 percent.
  • Posted by
    Abe Eshkenazi
    APICS CEO

    Recruiting the Right People for the Right Jobs

    I’ve had many conversations recently about the same theme: Supply chain and manufacturing offer great career opportunities. But how do we attract more people to these areas? We at APICS are not alone in this quest. I know this discussion is happening at many different employers, suppliers, and affiliated associations. Now, the topic has attracted the attention of mainstream media. Last week, The Wall Street Journal featured the article “How Manufacturers Are Recruiting Millennials.”