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William T. Walker, CPIM-F, CSCP-F, CLTD-F, CIRM
Adjunct Professor of Supply Chain Engineering
NYU Tandon School of Engineering


“Becoming APICS certified at the Fellow level has enabled me to give back to young professionals new to the supply chain field.”



After graduating Lehigh University with a BSEE, a tour of duty in Vietnam, ten years as a design engineer/production engineer at Hewlett-Packard, and graduating Lehigh again with a MSIE; I found myself a production manager at HP with little idea why so many production parts were backordered? In 1980 ASCM Member Itzhak Priel invited me to a George Plossl presentation. A year later I had joined the West Jersey Chapter and had earned CPIM certification. Over the next ten years I served APICS as West Jersey Chapter President, Region 2 Vice President, Vice President of Education-SIGS, and APICS Education & Research Foundation President. I was awarded the APICS Society Voluntary Service Award for 1999.

For the next twenty years HP’s business needs drove me from managing product development teams to building international supply chains. I became a CFPIM in 1989, and HP management promoted me to the combined role of Purchasing/ Materials Manager. CIRM, announced in 1993, was as close as one could get to a supply chain certification. I studied to be among the first to become CIRM certified. Business was tough; HP management decided to enter a new market which required a new supply chain. I became the supply chain architect for this new venture when the world didn’t know how to spell “supply chain”. Then HP spun off Agilent Technologies, and I became the division’s Asian Transfer Program Manager to move 100M$ of manufacturing from Rockaway, NJ to Penang, Malaysia. But as the transfer was successful, I became unemployed for the next seventeen months. In 2004 I went to work for Siemen’s Fire Products Division as Director of Supply Chain Management. This lasted fifteen months, and I was unemployed again. During this time CSCP certification was announced, and I studied to be among the first CSCP candidates. My last seven years in industry was spent as Director of Supply Chain Management for StarTrak Information Technologies, LLC. StarTrak is a virtual enterprise managing the design and manufacture of instrumentation and tracking software for refrigerated containers. Throughout my career I performed many different jobs and relied heavily on my APICS education.

Through my APICS network I was invited to write the Logistics Chapter for the Production & Inventory Control Handbook edited by Jim Greene. In the spring of 1998, I approached the APICS Certification & Curriculum Council with a one page list of supply chain and logistics topics that were not covered in the APICS body of knowledge. I then coauthored the monograph, Supply Chain Management: Principles and Techniques for the Practitioner, with Karen Alber published by the APICS E&R Foundation. In early 1999 Dave Rivers assembled eight subject matter experts, including me, to write the APICS Advanced Supply Chain Management courseware on CD-ROM. In September 2000, APICS President Carol Ptak made the first APICS World Wide Webcast to introduce ASCM; this predated CSCP certification courseware. Through my APICS network I was invited to write the Supply Chain Networks Chapter for Kevin McCormack’s book, Supply Chain Networks and Business Process Orientation. During my first unemployment I wrote the book Supply Chain Architecture published in October 2004.  After teaching supply chain to students for a few years I wrote the book Supply Chain Construction published in August 2015.

Before retiring from the industry, APICS friend Blair Williams invited me to guest lecture at New York University.  I am currently Adjunct Professor of Supply Chain Engineering at NYU Tandon School of Engineering in Brooklyn where I teach evening classes to graduate students majoring in Industrial Engineering. After retiring from industry, I also became a Part Time Lecturer at Rutgers Business School in Newark where I teach evening classes to undergraduate students majoring in Supply Chain Management. Since 2010, I have taught supply chain topics to more than 550 students. Many students have become involved in APICS and CSCP certification. In order to continue giving back and serving as a role model of life-long learning for students, I decided last year to study and be among the first CLTD certified, and this year to become CSCP-F and CLTD-F.  Now, at age 70, I have been an ASCM Member for half of my life, and am one of very few ASCM Members to be triple Fellow Certified.


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